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Heart Attack

A heart attack is a life-threatening situation that occurs when a blood vessel to the heart is blocked by a clot or plaque. When this occurs, heart muscle is deprived of oxygen and the damage causes pain, and reduces the heart's ability to pump blood. Without prompt treatment through the use of drugs like aspirin or a "clot buster" medication, or interventions to open the vessel, patients can become disabled or even die. Our goal is to quickly restore blood flow to the heart to prevent more damage and prevent future heart attacks by reducing blood pressure, maintaining heart rate/beats, and preventing clots.

We measure:
  • Was an aspirin given on arrival at the hospital?
Heart Attack Measures
( Higher is Better )

Measures
Performance Total
Performance Target
Graph & Details
Measure: Aspirin on Arrival
Performance Total: 100 %
Performance Target: 100 %

Stroke

A stroke, sometimes called a "brain attack," occurs when blood flow to the brain is interrupted. When a stroke occurs, brain cells in the immediate area begin to die because they stop getting the oxygen and nutrients they need to function. There are two major kinds of stroke:
  • An ischemic stroke is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel or artery in the brain.
  • A hemorrhagic stroke is caused by a blood vessel in the brain that breaks and bleeds into the brain.
Strokes can cause a loss of the ability to speak, memory problems, or paralysis on one side of the body. Getting the right care at the right time can help reduce the risk of complications and another stroke. These measures show some of the standards of stroke care that hospitals should follow, for adults who have had a stroke.
Stroke Measures
( Higher is Better )

Measures
Performance Total
Performance Target
Graph & Details
Measure: Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients or caregivers who received written educational materials about stroke care and prevention during the hospital stay
Performance Total: 100 %
Performance Target: 100 %
Measure: Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients who received treatment to keep blood clots from forming anywhere in the body within 2 days of arriving at the hospital
Performance Total: 100 %
Performance Target: 100 %
Measure: Ischemic stroke patients needing medicine to lower cholesterol, who were given a prescription for this medicine before discharge
Performance Total: 100 %
Performance Target: 100 %

VTE

Because hospital patients often have to stay in bed for long periods of time, any patient who is admitted to the hospital is at increased risk of developing a blood clot in the veins (known as venous thromboembolism). Blood clots can break off and travel to other parts of the body and cause serious problems, even death. Fortunately, there are safe, effective, and proven methods to prevent blood clots or to treat them when they occur.

Hospitals can prevent blood clots by routinely evaluating patients for their risk of developing blood clots and using appropriate prevention and treatment procedures. Prevention can include compression stockings, blood thinners, and/or other medicines.

 
VTE Measures

Measures
Performance Total
Performance Target
Graph & Details
Measure: Patients who got treatment to prevent blood clots on the day of or day after hospital admission or surgery. Higher percentages are better.
Performance Total: 100 %
Performance Target: 100 %
Measure: Patients who developed a blood clot while in the hospital who did not get treatment that could have prevented it. Lower percentages are better.
Performance Total: 0 %
Performance Target: 0 %